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British imperialist monuments face bitter calculations amid Black Lives Matter protests

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British imperialist monuments face bitter calculations amid Black Lives Matter protests
On Sunday, Black Lives Matter protesters in Bristol, England, knocked down the statue of 17th-century slave trader Edward Colston and rolled it through the streets before throwing it, without further ado, into the Avon River.

Some praised the move, while others condemned what they called the “rule of the masses.”

With colonial history the span of the century – and mania to erect sculptures in the 19th century – towns and cities of England adorned with monuments to figures such as Colston.

For some people, the statues have melted into the background of everyday life, but many people now question whether they should still stand on their pedestal.

On Tuesday, the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, announced a commission to examine the future of landmarks around the British capital, including murals, street art, street names and sculpture.

The Commission on Diversity in the Public Sphere aims to increase “diversity across London’s public sphere, to ensure that the capital’s appropriate landmarks reflect London’s achievements and diversity.”

The action against the statue associated with the slave trade and imperialism also gained traction in other parts of Europe, with protesters in Belgium damage to several monuments to King Leopold II in the last few days.
In the US, a series of Confederate statues was removed by authorities after widespread protests over the death of George Floyd.

While these actions have divided public opinion, they are a matter of growing discussion about what must happen to individual statues like Colston, who benefit from the suffering of so many people.

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill, Britain’s wartime prime minister, was appointed as an example of inspirational leadership, leading the defeat of Nazism in the country. In 2002, he topped a BBC national poll to find the 100 Greatest Britons, and his portrait currently appears on British £ 5 bills.
However, he is also known to have views relating to social hierarchy which will be regarded as racist today, and also his views the policy has been blamed because it caused the famine of Bengal in 1943, which is estimated to have claimed more than three million lives. In March 2019, a study used soil analysis for the first time to state that starvation was caused by Churchill’s policy and not by serious drought.

In the Black Lives Matter protest on Sunday, a Churchill statue standing in London Parliament Square was daubed with the words “… is a racist.”

Cecil Rhodes

Oriel College has so far kept this Cecil Rhodes statue despite ongoing campaigns for her appointment.

Oriel College has so far kept this Cecil Rhodes statue despite ongoing campaigns for her appointment. Credit: Carl Court / Getty Images

Cecil Rhodes, who helped build the British empire in southern Africa, is enshrined in a sculpture outside Oriel College, part of Oxford University.

In 2016, universities refused to remove jobs despite joint pressure by Rhodes Must Fall At Oxford campaign group, which continues to try to stop it.
“There is no place for statues that honor vile black anti-racists in South Africa, the United States, Bristol or Oxford,” the group said. tweeted on Sunday, inviting people to attend campus protests on Tuesday.

Neither the Oxford University nor Oriel College responded to CNN’s request for comment.

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In 2015, a statue of Rhodes was released from the campus of the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

“He represented the country’s former colonial representative – supremacy, racism, hatred of women,” said Ramabina Mahapa, president of the student group who led the campaign to remove the statue, at the time.

David Hume

A plaque was installed in protest against the statue of the Scottish Enlightenment philosopher David Hume, who condemned his racist views.

A plaque was installed in protest against the statue of the Scottish Enlightenment philosopher David Hume, who condemned his racist views. Credit: jpi media

In Edinburgh, the statue of 18th-century Scottish philosopher David Hume was adorned with a plaque that quoted his view of white superiority.

Hume is considered one of the leading thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment, and his bronze statue is located on the Royal Mile of Edinburgh, the city’s main thoroughfare.

But Hume’s reputation has been tarnished in recent years, with an increased focus on his views on race. The mark left on the statue displays a line from Hume’s essay “National Character” which says that he “tends to suspect Negroes … naturally inferior to whites.”

Nelson's Column, topped by a statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, the tower above Trafalgar Square in Central London.

Nelson’s Column, topped by a statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, the tower above Trafalgar Square in Central London. Credit: evenfh / Shutterstock

Henry Dundas

Statue of Scottish politician Henry Dundas stands on the Melville Monument in the city of Edinburgh.

Dundas, who held a number of government positions, including the Secretary of the Interior, was known for supporting the postponement of the abolition of slavery towards the end of the 18th century.

The monument was made graffitied during Sunday’s protest, and a Online petitions now call for the removal of the Dundas statue, and the streets named in his honor were renamed.

Activists instead recommend that the streets be named after Scottish-Jamaican slaves Joseph Knight, who managed to free himself in court by proving that Scottish law does not recognize slavery.

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Different approach

There is also a call to remove the statue that is dedicated to Admiral Horatio Nelson – the famous win over Napoleon and is now enshrined in a column in London’s Trafalgar Square – because oppose the abolition of slavery.
Similar calls have been made about portrayals William Gladstone, the former prime minister who helped his slave owner’s father demand compensation from the British government after the trade was banned.
William Gladstone served as Prime Minister of England four times in the 19th century. His father owned a slave.

William Gladstone served as Prime Minister of England four times in the 19th century. His father owned a slave. Credit: See Universal Pictures / Group Pictures / Getty Images

Tearing down the statues is a time-honored form of protest, from bringing down the statues of Lenin when the Soviet Union collapsed in 1989 to the fall of the Saddam Hussein monument in Baghdad in 2003.

These examples of devastation have received widespread acceptance in the Western world, but recent campaigns to eliminate statues of controversial figures in places such as the US and Britain have divided public opinion.

An alternative approach was taken in Paraguay, where artist Carlos Colombino was asked to re-arrange the statue of the former dictator General Alfredo Stroessner, who ruled the country from 1954 to 1989. Instead of just destroying the monument, Colombino wrapped some of the most recognizable parts between two beams large cement as a warning to victims of the dictatorship.

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Portuguese historical films will premiere on 29 December.

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Portuguese historical films will premiere on 29 December.

Method Media Bermuda will present the documentary FABRIC: Portuguese History in Bermuda on Thursday, December 29 at the Underwater Research Institute of Bermuda.

A spokesperson said: “Method Media is proud to bring Bermuda Fabric: Portugal History to Bermuda for its 5th and 6th showing at the Bermuda Underwater Observatory. In November and December 2019, Cloth: A Portuguese Story in Bermuda had four sold-out screenings. Now that Bermuda has reopened after the pandemic, it’s time to bring the film back for at least two screenings.

“There are tickets Ptix.bm For $ 20 – sessions at 15:30 and 18:00. Both screenings will be followed by a short Q&A session.

Director and producer Milton Raboso says, “FABRIC is a definitive account of the Portuguese community in Bermuda and its 151 years of history, but it also places Bermuda, Acors and Portugal in the world history and the events that have fueled those 151 years.

“It took more than 10 years to implement FABRIC. The film was supported by the Minister of Culture, the Government of the Azores and private donors.

Bermuda Media Method [MMB] Created in 2011 by producer Milton Raposo. MMB has created content for a wide range of clients: Bermuda’s new hospital renovation, reinsurance, travel campaigns, international sports and more. MMB pays special attention to artistic, cultural and historical content.

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CRISTANO RONALDO CAN MAKE UP A GIANT IN CARIOCA AND PORTUGUESE TECHNICIAN SAYS ‘There will be room’

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CRISTANO RONALDO CAN MAKE UP A GIANT IN CARIOCA AND PORTUGUESE TECHNICIAN SAYS 'There will be room'

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Maestro de Braga is the first Portuguese in the National Symphony Orchestra of Cuba.

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Maestro de Braga is the first Portuguese in the National Symphony Orchestra of Cuba.

Maestro Filipe Cunha, Artistic Director of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Braga, has been invited to conduct the Cuban National Symphony Orchestra, as announced today.

According to a statement sent by O MINHO, “he will be the first Portuguese conductor to conduct this orchestra in its entire history.”

In addition to this orchestra, the maestro will also work with the Lyceo Mozarteum de la Habana Symphony Orchestra.

The concerts will take place on 4 and 12 March 2023 at the National Theater of Cuba in Havana.

In the words of the maestro, quoted in the statement, “these will be very beautiful concerts with difficult but very complex pieces” and therefore he feels “very motivated”.

From the very beginning, Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 will be performed by an Italian pianist (Luigi Borzillo), whom the maestro wants to bring to Portugal later this year. In the same concert, Mendelshon’s First Symphony will be performed.

Then, at the second concert, in the company of the Mexican clarinetist Angel Zedillo, he will perform the Louis Sfora Concerto No. 2. In this concert, the maestro also conducts Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony.

“This is an international recognition of my work. An invitation that I accept with humility and great responsibility. I was surprised to learn that I would be the first Portuguese member of the Cuban National Symphony Orchestra. This is a very great honor,” the maestro said in a statement.

“I take with me the name of the city of Braga and Portugal with all the responsibility that goes with it, and I hope to do a good job there, leaving a good image and putting on great concerts. These will be very special concerts because, in addition to performing pieces that I love, especially Rachmaninov and Tchaikovsky, I will be directing two wonderful soloists who are also my friends. It will be very beautiful,” concludes Filipe Cunha.

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