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Thousands take to the streets of several European cities for LGBTI Pride marches – News

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In Lisbon, the pandemic has led to the cancellation of a scheduled LGBTI Pride demonstration today, and in London, which is usually heavily attended, the march has been postponed for similar reasons.

In Berlin, protesters followed three routes towards Alexanderplatz, in the center of the German capital, in a format designed to avoid crowds too large due to the covid-19 pandemic, but to reflect the diversity of the LGBTI community.

In Italy, thousands of Pride participants gathered in Rome and some small towns.

With a proposed anti-LGBTI hate crime law sitting in the Italian Senate for months, the Vatican and right-wing political leaders are lobbying for the repeal of several stipulated provisions.

Milan Mayor Giuseppe Sala, who marched in the city, said he was concerned that those who objected to the anti-homophobia bill were trying to debate it only to tie him up and eventually kill him.

Sala justified his participation in the march as a sign in defense of the passage of the law and in support of “the just rights of this entire wonderful community.”

The general mood of tens of thousands of participants in the Paris event was festive after almost a year and a half of restrictions imposed by the pandemic on meetings and communication.

Half of French adults have already taken at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, prompting many protesters to take part in parades without masks.

Many participants in Paris expressed dismay at the backlash from human rights defenders in Hungary and Poland, two EU member states led by right-wing governments.

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“If European leaders tolerate this, what prevents them from accepting the same in their countries?” said Mornia Pomel-Pichon, a 26-year-old illustrator quoted by the Associated Press.

Last year, the Polish president said that the term LGBTI does not refer to people, but to an ideology more dangerous than communism, which for several decades dominated this former Soviet bloc country.

In Barcelona, ​​participants in the 45th Orgulho LGTBI demonstration called for a “more ambitious” trances law and condemned the rise in homophobic aggression.

Several hundred people began the demonstration in the University Square around 6:30 pm, which continued along Rue Pelai and ended in Plaza Sant Jaume, where the Generalitat’s headquarters and the City Hall are located.

The demonstrators focused on “transgender people” who, in their opinion, suffer more from “insecurity and discrimination in employment.”

Daniel Lima Guerra said on behalf of the LGBTI group Crida that the organization is fighting for the “trans” law.

“We want to warn the PSOE because we do not agree with what they are offering us,” he said in media statements quoted by Efe.

At the end of the march, four manifestos were read out, highlighting the challenges faced by the LGBTI community, such as work and housing, and racism and feminism as a result of open participation. on the march to other social movements.

In North Macedonia, hundreds of people marched in the capital, Skopje, at the country’s second gay pride parade.

The protesters carried a large rainbow flag, applauded and danced to the music that sounded from a car with loudspeakers.

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Last year, North Macedonia’s parliament passed an anti-discrimination law, which is seen as the cornerstone of a decade-long civil society struggle to protect the country’s most vulnerable and marginalized communities.

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Vladimir Putin has delayed the invasion of Ukraine at least three times.

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Putin has repeatedly consulted with Russian Chief of the General Staff Valery Gerasimov and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu about the invasion, Europa Press told Ukraine’s chief intelligence director Vadim Skibitsky.

According to Skibitsky, it was the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), which is responsible for counterintelligence and espionage work, that put pressure on Gerasimov and other military agencies to agree to launch an offensive. .

However, according to the Ukrainian intelligence services, the FSB considered that by the end of February sufficient preparations had already been made to guarantee the success of the Russian Armed Forces in a lightning invasion.

However, according to Kyiv, the Russian General Staff provided the Russian troops with supplies and ammunition for only three days, hoping that the offensive would be swift and immediately successful.

The head of Ukrainian intelligence also emphasized the cooperation of local residents, who always provided the Ukrainian authorities with up-to-date information about the Russian army, such as the number of soldiers or the exact location of troops.

The military offensive launched on February 24 by Russia in Ukraine caused at least 6.5 million internally displaced persons and more than 7.8 million refugees to European countries, which is why the UN classifies this migration crisis as the worst in Europe since World War II (1939-1945). gg.). ).

At the moment, 17.7 million Ukrainians are in need of humanitarian assistance, and 9.3 million are in need of food aid and housing.

The UN has presented as confirmed 6,755 civilian deaths and 10,607 wounded since the beginning of the war, stressing that these figures are much lower than the real ones.

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Life sentence for former Swedish official for spying for Russia

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A Stockholm court on Monday sentenced a former Swedish intelligence officer to life in prison for spying for Russia, and his brother to at least 12 years in prison. In what is considered one of the most serious cases in Swedish counterintelligence history, much of the trial took place behind closed doors in the name of national security.

According to the prosecution, it was Russian military intelligence, the GRU, who took advantage of the information provided by the two brothers between 2011 and their arrest at the end of 2021.

Peyman Kia, 42, has held many senior positions in the Swedish security apparatus, including the army and his country’s intelligence services (Säpo). His younger brother, Payam, 35, is accused of “participating in the planning” of the plot and of “managing contacts with Russia and the GRU, including passing on information and receiving financial rewards.”

Both men deny the charges, and their lawyers have demanded an acquittal on charges of “aggravated espionage,” according to the Swedish news agency TT.

The trial coincides with another case of alleged Russian espionage, with the arrest of the Russian-born couple in late November in a suburb of Stockholm by a police team arriving at dawn in a Blackhawk helicopter.

Research website Bellingcat identified them as Sergei Skvortsov and Elena Kulkova. The couple allegedly acted as sleeper agents for Moscow, having moved to Sweden in the late 1990s.

According to Swedish press reports, the couple ran companies specializing in the import and export of electronic components and industrial technology.

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The man was again detained at the end of November for “illegal intelligence activities.” His partner, suspected of being an accomplice, has been released but remains under investigation.

According to Swedish authorities, the arrests are not related to the trial of the Kia brothers.

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Ukraine admitted that Russia may announce a general mobilization

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“They can strengthen their positions. We understand that this can happen. At the same time, we do not rule out that they will announce a general mobilization,” Danilov said in an interview with the Ukrainska Pravda online publication.

Danilov believed that this mobilization would also be convened “to exterminate as many as possible” of Russian citizens, so that “they would no longer have any problems on their territory.”

In this sense, Danilov also reminded that Russia has not given up on securing control over Kyiv or the idea of ​​the complete “destruction” of Ukraine. “We have to be ready for anything,” he said.

“I want everyone to understand that [os russos] they have not given up on the idea of ​​destroying our nation. If they don’t have Kyiv in their hands, they won’t have anything in their hands, we must understand this,” continued Danilov, who also did not rule out that a new Russian offensive would come from “Belarus and other territories.” .

As such, Danilov praised the decision of many of its residents who chose to stay in the Ukrainian capital when the war broke out in order to defend the city.

“They expected that there would be panic, that people would run, that there would be nothing to protect Kyiv,” he added, referring to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The military offensive launched on February 24 by Russia in Ukraine caused at least 6.5 million internally displaced persons and more than 7.8 million refugees to European countries, which is why the UN classifies this migration crisis as the worst in Europe since World War II (1939-1945). gg.). ).

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At the moment, 17.7 million Ukrainians are in need of humanitarian assistance, and 9.3 million are in need of food aid and housing.

The Russian invasion, justified by Russian President Vladimir Putin on the need to “denazify” and demilitarize Ukraine for Russia’s security, was condemned by the international community at large, which responded by sending weapons to Ukraine and imposing political and economic sanctions on Russia.

The UN has presented as confirmed 6,755 civilian deaths and 10,607 wounded since the beginning of the war, stressing that these figures are much lower than the real ones.

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