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Eternal Portuguese deja vu – Renaissance

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Eternal Portuguese deja vu - Renaissance

At the end of the summer of 1972, exactly half a century ago, SEDES – Associação para o Desenvolvimento Económico e Social (the most famous reformist think tank during Marseilles) issued a document for the country entitled “Portugal: The country we are, the country we want to be “. The Marseille spring had already turned into autumn: Américo Thomas had just been re-elected, the colonial war had dragged on, repression had intensified, and an economic crisis was already brewing. Seeing the general frustration, and at the same time willing to go against it, the signatories of CEDES began by asking “Where will we be and how will we be in 1980?” to criticize the obstacles that overshadowed Portugal in the early 1970s.

Among the “problems that are getting worse without a solution”, emigration stood out, indicating the country’s inability to offer better living and working conditions to those who left; the growing inflationary process, reflected in the cost of living; the inevitability of economic integration in Europe when the country is not ready for international commercial competition; “disaggregation of regional economies” with “continuous depopulation of municipalities and regions” within the country; or “deterioration of public administration” when the government fails to promote a “prestigious, moralized, revitalized and efficient public sector”. “No one will have any difficulty,” continued the text, “to add to a new list of urgent questions that seriously endanger national life, about which much has been said and which, year after year, continue to wait for a sufficient solution.” Therefore, “the prevailing feeling in the country” in contemplation of the recent past and present could not but be “annoyance at urgent battles, the need for which was endlessly discussed, at decisions that were changed or postponed, and at rejected goals” or which were not clearly formulated ” .

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Between “untapped resources” and/or “lack of organizational and decision-making capacity” there was “widespread anxiety” stemming from the inevitable observation that “we are very far from the results that we could achieve thanks to the progress of the Portuguese and Portugal”. This was the macro goal of the reformist, humanist and liberalizing technocrats that SEDES brought together. “Ultimately,” they reminded Marcelo Cayetano, “the real obstacle can only be associated with the low political priority of economic and social development in our country.” So, in short, there was an urgent need to “radically change our economic, social and political way of life”, since “a national balance based on general anemia, repression and weakening of various participants” is unsustainable and pernicious.

SEDES did not know that the Estado Novo would fall in April 1974, that democracy would come in 1976, and Europe from the EEC (after EFTA) in 1986 of repression, finally gained the freedom that was discussed between the lines of the 1972 manifesto ., there would be conditions for solving (almost) all economic and social problems of development and cohesion.

Fifty years have passed since this manifesto, and almost the same number has already been in democracy. However, if we compare the above quotes with the Portuguese present, the feeling of deja vu is indescribable. SEDES wondered what the country would be like in 1980 and is wondering today (in its recent study “Ambition: Doubling GDP in 20 Years”) where we will be in 2040. It may be a replay of a sad fate: knowing (some) where to go, but never getting there!

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Dictionary of Medieval Portuguese

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Dictionary of Medieval Portuguese

It will take place today (28-11) at 18:00 at the Leia Buholz bookstore (Lisbon), Dictionary of Medieval Portuguese (DLPM), the result of a project developed between 2004 and 2007 at the Center for Linguistics of the University of Nova de Lisboa (UNL) and coordinated by João Malaca Castelleiro (University of Lisbon – ULisboa), Maria Francisco Xavier (UNL), both deceased, and Maria de Lourdes Crispim, former professor at UNL. The work, published in July this year, has been approved by the editors of Caminho.

DLPM records and describes vocabulary covering the period between the 19th and 19th centuries. XII and the beginning of the century. XVI, i.e. it is integrated into the so-called pre-literary (until about the end of the 12th century), Galician-Portuguese or ancient (until 1385/1420) and preclassical or middle (until 1536/1550) Portuguese periods. The periodization of Portuguese also includes Classical Portuguese (16th to 18th century) and Modern Portuguese (19th century to the present day).

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“Lionel Messi is not an Argentine, Cristiano Ronaldo is not a Portuguese…”

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"Lionel Messi is not an Argentine, Cristiano Ronaldo is not a Portuguese..."

O Brazilian defender Marquinhos said players like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo are a “privilege” and a “treasure” for football and football fans.

The Paris Saint-Germain centre-back spoke to reporters ahead of the Brazilian’s second World Cup game against Switzerland, scheduled for this Monday. Marquinhos, Messi’s PSG teammate, was asked about the role of these players in the king of the sport.

“I think what’s happening with these players is that Messi is not Argentine, Cristiano is not Portuguese… they move on. They are a perk for football. For people who love this sport, tournaments, competitions, they are a treasure. They don’t just belong to their countries. We all enjoy their presence watching them play. I played with Neymar, with Messi, and I benefit from their presence. Life goes on, other generations will come, but we have to make the most of it,” the centre-back explained.

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″I couldn’t get to the meeting well″

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″I couldn't get to the meeting well″

The Portuguese tennis player lost to the Japanese Yosuke Watanuki in just two sets.

Portuguese tennis player Frederico Silva said this Sunday that he didn’t manage to get “well” into the Yokkaichi Challenger final and that his rival Yosuke Watanuki “has always been at the top” to win the title “with some naturalness”.

The player from Caldas da Rainha, ranked 244th in the ATP rankings, lost to the Japanese player, ranked 173rd in the world, in just two “sets” with partial scores of 6-2 and 6-2, after an hour and 21 minute.

“Obviously, this was not the result I wanted. It was a match that I didn’t get off to a good start, my opponent started much better and throughout the match he always stayed on top with a good level and ended up not letting me balance. result. He managed to close the two parts with some naturalness,” he commented in statements to the Lusa agency.

For the second week in a row, Frederico Silva reached the final of the Candidates Tournament, the third of his career, after losing the title of the tournament in Kobe last Sunday to the same opponent, 24-year-old Yosuke Watanuki.

“It’s been a good two weeks. Obviously when you reach the final you want to win, but I have to look at these tournaments positively. I played good matches, I played well in a few matches, and now look what happened much worse and try to improve so that next season you have more opportunities to play in the finals and have a chance to win tournaments, “added the Portuguese tennis player.

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