Connect with us

Politics

Chamber analyzes requests for persecution and political use of Caixa

Published

on

Chamber analyzes requests for persecution and political use of Caixa

Written in POLITICS in

Three requests have begun to be processed in the Chamber of Deputies regarding the political use of the Caixa Econômica Federal to promote Bolsonaro’s candidacy for re-election, clarify the “meritocracy” criteria adopted by the state bank, and set up a subcommittee to oversee the investigation into the allegations. persecution in the state. The documents submitted to the Administration and Public Service Commission (CTASP) by Deputy Erica Kokay (PT-DF) have the support of the National Federation of Staff Associations Caixa (Fenae).

“Guidance of Pedro Guimarães [ex-presidente da empresa, afastado por denúncias de assédios moral e sexual] disgusted the workers and put the bank on the pages of the police. We do not accept this behavior with workers or the political use of Caixa for elections,” Fenae President Sergio Takemoto said. “Caixa does not belong to the presidents of the banks or the president of the republic. Caixa belongs to the Brazilian people,” he emphasizes.

One of the demands calls for Economy Minister Paulo Guedes to be summoned to justify the “campaign” of Caixa President Daniella Marquez during office hours. In an advertisement for the Caixa Pra Elas program, Márquez tagged Jair Bolsonaro in her social media posts. According to the legislation that establishes the norms for the conduct of elections, representatives of the authorities are prohibited from campaigning during working hours.

“We ask that the Minister of Economy be convened to explain to the public this absolutely illegal position of President Caixa to use the institute as an election platform,” the deputy explains. “We cannot allow this selective crime to take place inside the institution,” he adds.

See also  Caio Says Political Discussion "Extrapolates"

Another request calls for Paulo Guedes to be called in to have the minister explain the criteria for “meritocracy” adopted by Caixa. The document notes that former bank president Pedro Guimarães claimed to be in charge of an administration based on meritocratic concepts. “However, the facts showed that such a meritocracy was only a mask to hide the offensive practices of moral persecution and criminal sexual harassment,” the parliamentarian emphasizes.

The document also highlights the lack of technical parameters to fill functions and leadership positions at Caixa, while highly qualified employees are discriminated against and excluded from the selection process for participating in a strike, a right guaranteed by the Constitution. “The criterion of patronage of some and persecution of others prevails in the company,” the deputy emphasizes.

According to Sergio Takemoto, a study published this year by Fenae found an increase in the number of state-owned bank employees facing moral harassment: 6 out of 10 bank employees said they had experienced such situations. In a previous study commissioned by the Federation of the University of Brasilia (UnB), this figure reached 53.6%.

The current Fenae survey also showed that working in a bank affects the health of 80% of employees. It also brought other disturbing data: 33% were absent due to depression, 26% due to anxiety, 13% due to burnout and 11% due to panic.

Sexual harassment – The third request concerns the establishment of a sub-committee to oversee the investigation into allegations of sexual harassment committed by Pedro Guimarães against bank employees. The cases are investigated by the Civil Police of the Federal District, the State Department of Labor (MPT), the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), the State Ministry at the Federal Audit Court (TCU) and the Bank’s Department of the Interior.

See also  Who is Zhang Gaoli, the Chinese politician accused of abuse by the tennis star?

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Politics

Solidarity with Ukraine is overshadowed by the political and economic agenda of the powers

Published

on

Research Shows Inflation and Political Scenario Influences Real Estate Purchases

SAO PAULO, SP (FOLHAPRESS) — Since Russia invaded Ukraine, sparking a proxy conflict between Moscow and Washington/European Allies, governments and multilateral organizations have mobilized to respond to one of Europe’s biggest humanitarian emergencies with times of World War II.

By the end of September, according to the UN, more than 13 million Ukrainians had crossed the border to escape the war, of which 7.5 million had taken refuge in European countries.

However, the official narrative of solidarity and benevolent participation hardly obscures traditional political and economic interests in this type of transnational response to clashes that affect many civilians. A reminder from Luisa Mateo, professor of international relations at PUC-SP (Pontifical Catholic University).

It is clear that initiatives such as the EU-approved device allowing Ukrainian refugees to stay in the bloc’s 27 countries for up to three years, with access to education, work and social security (and without the need for a visa) are important. Or British Homes for Ukraine, a similar program but which makes the issuance of a visa a prerequisite for the entry of citizens displaced by the war.

Or the roughly $8 billion (41 billion reais) already donated by USAID, the North American Agency for International Development, to support basic services (notably hospitals, schools, access to electricity, food, and housing). 3 billion dollars (15 billion reais) in August alone.

But these transfers pale in comparison to the contribution of Washington and Brussels to strengthening the response of the Ukrainian military to Russian attacks. The United States alone has pledged to send more than $13.5 billion (73 billion reais) in arms and ammunition since February this year. At least 19 military aid packages have been received in the past 12 months.

See also  Caio Says Political Discussion "Extrapolates"

“This help [com armas e munições] it fuels the conflict,” says Mateo. “Humanitarian aid ends up as a simple response to public opinion to try to balance the participation of these countries in the war machine.”

Another knot in humanitarian aid, according to the professor, is the distance between the amounts promised by the powers that fund the main UN agencies and what is actually allocated.

“Many countries end up opting for a two-way route [de governo para governo, sem a intermediação de órgãos multilaterais]. This allows, for example, tighter control over the allocation of resources and the involvement of carefully selected private partners, consolidating the aid industry machine,” notes Mateo.

According to the researcher, the donation tap should remain open while the conflict is active, since the theater of war, it is worth remembering, takes place in the backyard of the European Union, and not in some remote latitudes. But the context of the global economic crisis should become an element of pressure on the remittances of new billionaires.

Meanwhile, the Ukrainian government announced in July that rebuilding the country would cost 750 billion euros. Even if this budget is inflated, it will indeed take several more rounds of packages (in the form of grants, low-interest loans and foreign debt freezes, among other things) to lift the Black Sea country out of the swamp.

Brazil Offers Humble Help Brazilian aid to Ukraine received its main chapter at the start of the conflict, in March of this year. The FAB plane delivered more than 11 tons of food, medicines and water purifiers to Poland, from where the shipments were sent to the border region with a neighboring country.

See also  the merits of the deputy reflect more political interests than the victory of the industry

The shipment was donated by a fast food company. But the main task of the aircraft, in fact, was to return the Brazilians displaced by the war.

Since then, the world’s fourth-largest colony of Ukrainians (after Russia, the US and Canada) has had a limited response to the humanitarian emergency. It is estimated that there are about 500,000 descendants of Ukrainians in Brazil, most of them in Paraná.

The Ukrainian-Brazilian central office, for example, collected about 600,000 reais from folklore shows and coffee producers exporting to the European country, which were donated to the Ukrainian embassy in Brasilia.

According to the president of the organization, lawyer Vitorio Sorotyuk, an agreement was also made with the Paraná government foundation for the arrival of 16 teachers from the troubled country (from fields such as biological sciences, history and pedagogy).

The agreement between the largest children’s hospital in Kyiv and the Latin American hospital Pequeno Príncipe based in Curitiba is also part of the mission’s working group. The idea is to promote the exchange of doctors and the education of pediatric nurses.

There is no summary data on the arrival of Ukrainian refugees in Brazil.

Continue Reading

Politics

Brazil: Lula voted his political birth and kissed the ballot – Atualidade

Published

on

Brazil: Lula voted his political birth and kissed the ballot - Atualidade

The leader in voting intent polls, Lula da Silva, was accompanied by his vice presidential candidate Geraldo Alkmin, his wife, pollster Rosangela da Silva, PT president Glasey Hoffmann, and PT’s São Paulo government candidate Fernando. Haddad.

After the vote, the candidate from the Workers’ Party (PT) kissed the ballot and left the room.

With “odds” of winning the first round, Lula da Silva has between 50% and 51% of voting intentions, according to polls released on Saturday by DataFolha and Ipec respectively, followed by Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro with 36 votes. , % and 37% of voting intentions, Siro Gomes (5% and 5%, in both polls) and Simona Tebet (6% and 5%).

Unlike previous elections, all polling stations opened at 08:00 in Brasilia (12:00 in Lisbon), in a peculiar subordination of all polling stations to the time zone of the Brazilian capital.

More than 156 million voters will be able to vote until 17:00 in Brasilia (21:00 in Lisbon) using 577,125 electronic voting machines located in 5,570 cities across the country.

In addition to Lula da Silva and Bolsonaro, candidates in the Brazilian presidential elections are Ciro Gomes, Simone Tebet, Luis Felipe D’Avila, Soraya Tronicke, Eimael, father Kelmon, Leonardo Pericles, Sofia Manzano and Vera Lucia.

If no presidential candidate receives more than 50% of the valid votes, the top two voters will face each other again in a second round on 30 October.

See also  the merits of the deputy reflect more political interests than the victory of the industry
Continue Reading

Politics

Elections are taking place in an unprecedented atmosphere of fear and political violence – 01.10.2022 – Poder

Published

on

Elections are taking place in an unprecedented atmosphere of fear and political violence - 01.10.2022 - Poder

Brazilians go to the polls this Sunday (2) in an unprecedented atmosphere of fear and violence in a presidential election. From assassinations of voters to threats to candidates, the controversy has replicated a pattern previously seen in municipal elections and signaled that political polarization had reached a new level.

“We have never reached such elections. In general, you see more violence in municipal elections, candidates for councilors. Beyond the violence against candidates, what’s new is this wave of gratuitous violence and intolerance of dissent,” says the CEO. from the Sous da Paz Institute, Carolina Ricardo.

Even before the official start of the campaign, cases of aggression were already accumulating. In July, a Bolsonarist police officer broke into a birthday party and shot and killed a PT gunman in Foz do Iguacu (PN).

That same month, a walk with Marcelo Freixo (PSB), a candidate for the RJ government, was abandoned after armed supporters of Bolsonarist state deputy Rodrigo Amorim (PTB) issued threats.

Fear of violence prompted the Federal Police to create the largest security scheme in history to protect presidential candidates. Lula’s campaign has even canceled travel, revised the structure of rallies and outlined a plan to prevent supporters from voting for fear of aggression.

“There were cases in Foz do Iguacu, Mato Grosso, Ceara, Santa Catarina. These are people who have not been at the center of the political debate,” says sociologist David Marquez, project coordinator for the Brazilian Public Security Forum. “People are now afraid to go out in a T-shirt, stick a sticker on a car, put a brooch in a backpack. They are afraid of being threatened or being drawn into conflict.”

In early September, a supporter of President Jair Bolsonaro (PL) admitted to stabbing a colleague in Mato Grosso following a political dispute in which the victim was defending Lula.

In September, a PT supporter in Santa Catarina killed, also stabbed, a man wearing a shirt that mentioned Bolsonaro. Police are investigating if there was a political motivation.

Last Thursday (29) in Brasilia, the car and house of Bolsonaro’s ex-wife, district candidate Ana Cristina Valle (PP-DF) were vandalized. She and her son, Jair Renan Bolsonaro, posted short videos of the incident on social media and offered political motivations for the attack.

A survey conducted by the Brazilian Public Security Forum in partnership with the Political Action Network for Resilience and commissioned by the Datafolha Institute found that 67.5% of respondents fear physical attack because of their political or party choice.

The fears of voters are shared by politicians. About 50 candidates have recently suffered some form of political violence and are in need of assistance or special security measures, according to PSOL — an acronym for adviser Marielle Franco, who was killed in 2018 as a result of an unsolved crime.

Civil society organizations Justiça Global and Terra de Direitos have been monitoring cases of political violence in Brazil since 2016. Justiça Global general coordinator Sandra Carvalho says she fears that fear of violence is intimidating candidates from already minority groups in politics, such as women and blacks, stressing that numbers have begun to point to an upward trend in 2019.

See also  Caio Says Political Discussion "Extrapolates"

“Political violence is repeated in the history of the country, but we are already seeing an intensification of the campaign to elect the incumbent president. Since then, there has been an upward trend,” she says. “We are seeing campaigns by some segments that are much more timid for fear of being attacked in any way, a danger to the democratic process, because this can increasingly mean under-representation of certain segments.”

On Thursday (29) at a meeting with international observers, the chairman of the TSE (Supreme Electoral Court) Alexandre de Moraes said that justice will guarantee freedom and security in the elections.

To reduce the risk of violence, the court banned CACs (hunters, shooters and collectors) from carrying guns and ammunition between Saturday (1st) and Monday (3rd) and developed new text to ban mobile phones from entering cabins. .

No wonder we got here this way. In addition to the complete ease of buying weapons, since more than 40 rules have facilitated this access, in recent years, a discourse has flared up about access to weapons, especially presidential weapons, ”says Carolina Ricardo.

The wave of violence also led the TSE to reach an agreement with the CBF (Brazilian Football Confederation). A giant inflatable electronic ballot box with the words “Peace in Elections” was installed on the field for seven games. The motto was shared by the leading football teams in the country.

David Marquez of the Brazilian Public Safety Forum says it is difficult to gauge the impact of the 2022 campaign in the next election. For him, the answer may lie in survey results.

See also  “We are going to strengthen this political group to help Fatima,” says Carlos Eduardo - 23.07.2022 - News

“In 2018 in Sao Paulo you had [o ex-governador] Joao Doria says the police need to shoot to kill. In Rio de Janeiro [o ex-governador] Wilson Witzel said the police had to shoot him in the head. The public safety agenda was also very important to Bolsonaro. He spoke about the exclusion of lawlessness for police officers and the arming of society, ”says the sociologist.

“In all these cases, it’s about the fact that we need to use violence to make public policy, to control crime. And this, in some aspects, also goes through political relations, to political debate in general. What we will need this Sunday to see if this wave of aggression will be intensified again or if it will be stopped by the general vote.”

According to Carolina Ricardo of the Instituto Sou da Paz, the solution lies with democracy itself. “Institutions are responding. And the way for everyone is to come, vote, elect anyone who thinks they should be elected to show that democracy prevails and is stronger than specific instances of political violence.”

Continue Reading

Trending