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A typical Ukrainian soup is a UNESCO heritage site: Russia’s outraged reaction

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Russia reacted with indignation at UNESCO’s inclusion of the typical Ukrainian “borscht” in the list of intangible cultural heritage under threat, a new “front” in the bilateral conflict.

Following the announcement by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Minister of Culture of Ukraine Oleksandr Tkatchenko commented on the Telegram social network that “Ukraine will win the Borscht war, just like this war,” referring to the armed conflict with Russia.

On the Russian side, Moscow diplomats almost immediately condemned the UNESCO decision, accusing the Ukrainians of appropriating the dish as a form of “modern nationalism.”

“It could be something in common, in which every city, every district, every owner of everyone cooks in his own way, but they [ucranianos] they didn’t want to compromise, and this is xenophobia, Nazism, extremism in all its manifestations,” Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova criticized.

“Hummus and rice for pilaf are recognized as national dishes in many countries,” Zakharova continued, “but “Ukrainization” concerns everything. What will happen next? Will pigs be recognized as a Ukrainian national product?” Zakharova joked on the Telegram social network.

borscht soup

Borsch, made from beets and meat, is a traditional soup usually served with plain or garlic bread, widely consumed in Ukraine as well as Russia.

Justifying the UNESCO decision, Pier Luigi Petrillo, a representative of the Ukrainian commission for evaluating the dossier, said that “it is not the very existence of this soup that is in danger, but the human and living heritage associated with“ borscht ”. … in imminent danger, given that the ability of the population to practice and transmit their intangible cultural heritage has been severely undermined by the armed conflict, in particular by the forced displacement of communities.”

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In mid-April, Ukraine filed for the soup to be added to the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Danger, arguing that the February 24 Russian invasion of the country and the months of bombing that followed had jeopardized the dish’s “viability”. tradition.

“The population is no longer able to cook or even grow the local vegetables needed to make borscht,” Petrillo commented.

“They can’t get together to practice making ‘borscht’, which jeopardizes social and cultural aspects. Thus, the transfer of this element is in jeopardy,” he continued.

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The Prime Minister of Finland danced at a private party, and the opposition does not forgive it | celebrities

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Finland’s prime minister is back in the spotlight this week, again for reasons other than her leadership style. In a video posted on social media, Sanna Marin dances and sings with a group of friends. As a result, opposition party leaders are demanding that the 36-year-old government official undergo a drug test, and argue that such an attitude is not appropriate for a government official.

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Suitcases containing the remains of two children sold at auction in New Zealand

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New Zealand police said the remains of two children were found in suitcases bought at an auction in Auckland, New Zealand’s largest city.

Inspector Tofilau Faamanuia Waaelua said that the bodies of the victims, aged between five and ten years, were probably hidden for several years in two suitcases of the same size.

“The nature of the discovery makes the investigation challenging, especially given the time that has elapsed between death and discovery,” Waaelua said.

The family found the bags after purchasing a trailer full of items sold in bulk from a warehouse, with an official stating that the family in question was unrelated to the death but “understandably distraught at the find.”

Police, who also called Interpol, are searching the trailer for other household items and personal items to identify the victims.

The warehouse and property where the bags were found were thoroughly inspected by a forensic team.

“We are doing our best to identify the victims” in order to bring to justice the perpetrator or perpetrators of the deaths of these children, Waaelua said.

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Arctic. The next point of tension with Putin after the war in Ukraine? – Observer

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Svalbard is an icy archipelago with a population of less than 3,000 and it is essential to carry weapons when leaving the cities due to the risk of polar bear attacks. It is the northernmost permanently inhabited region on the entire globe. And this is also Achilles’ heel of NATO in the Arcticwhat did you once call it Professor of Security Studies.

Formally, Svalbard is under the sovereignty of Norway, but thanks to a century-old treaty, many other countries have the right to exploit its natural resources. In particular, Russia, which has been mining in the region for years, often employs Ukrainian workers, mostly from the Donbass. In the abandoned city of Pyramidyou can still find a bust of Lenin and slogan which says: “Communism is our goal.”

Entrance to the abandoned city of Pyramiden, where Soviet mines worked for decades.

Generic Image Group via Getty

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