Connect with us

Economy

Why Pfizer and AstraZeneca’s protection has fallen over the years

Published

on

Why Pfizer and AstraZeneca's protection has fallen over the years

CAs explained in an article published by BBC News, a survey conducted in the United Kingdom analyzed positive PCR test results between May and July 2021 of more than one million people who received two doses of Pfizer or AstraZeneca vaccine against the novel coronavirus.

In the study, the researchers found that protection after two doses of Pfizer diminished from 88% within one month to 74% within five to six months. However, among those who received the AstraZeneca vaccine, the decline was from 77% to 67% in four to five months. According to experts, such a decrease in protection was predictable.

Read also: Pfizer Seeks US Approval for Booster Dose of Its Vaccine

However, the researchers note that while infections do occur in fully immunized people, vaccines do an excellent job of protecting populations from severe Covid and reducing deaths from the disease.

According to BBC Public Health England, the British government’s public health agency, about 84,600 deaths and 23 million infections have been prevented by the new coronavirus due to vaccinations.

Professor Tim Spector of King’s College London (KCL), head of the study, based on data from the country’s Zoe Covid epidemiological study app, says the results may explain recent infections reported by fully vaccinated people.

“Reduced protection is expected, and this is not a reason for not being vaccinated,” Spector says.

“Vaccines still provide a high level of protection for the majority of the population, especially against the Delta variant, so we still need as many people as possible to fully immunize.”

See also  Trinidad and Tobago is one of the new destinations for KLM. And now it's easier to get from Porto, Lisbon or Faro - News

The expert argues that in the coming winter, protection against infections may drop by up to 50% and that it may be necessary to take booster doses.

The UK is expected to start offering some people a third booster dose of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine as early as September, but the government has yet to make an official decision.

“Many people may not need this. Many people may have received a natural booster vaccine because they already had a natural Covid infection, so they will essentially be taking three vaccines, ”Spector says.

“Therefore, this problem needs to be dealt with with much more care than simply [a terceira dose] the entire population, which would be a waste and ethically questionable given the resources we have. I think we need a more focused approach than last time, ”he concluded.

Read also: Brazil promotes third dose of vaccine for seniors in September

Always be the first to know.
Consumers’ Choice of the Internet Press for the fifth consecutive year.
Download our free app.


Google Play Download

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Economy

Facebook owner lost nearly 7% on Wall Street’s new red day – IVF

Published

on

Facebook owner lost nearly 7% on Wall Street's new red day - IVF





Facebook owner lost nearly 7% on Wall Street’s new red day – IVF
































Your browser is out of date!

Update your browser to get the best experience and visualization of this site. Update your browser now

×

See also  Red tide at the opening of the Lisbon Stock Exchange. Greenvolt yields over 3% - Stock Exchange
Continue Reading

Economy

Private consumption and investment could lead to a decline in GDP in the fourth quarter – ECO

Published

on

Private consumption and investment could lead to a decline in GDP in the fourth quarter - ECO





Private consumption and investment could lead to a decline in GDP in the fourth quarter – ECO






























Your browser is out of date!

Update your browser to get the best experience and visualization of this site. Update your browser now

×

See also  Nikola shares up 45% after General Motors acquired 11% of electric truck maker
Continue Reading

Economy

Portugal Could Become a Reshoring Hub in Europe According to New Report – Executive Digest

Published

on

Portugal Could Become a Reshoring Hub in Europe According to New Report - Executive Digest

European companies are looking in the EMEA region (which covers Europe, the Middle East and Africa) for an alternative to manufacturing and sourcing in Ukraine and Asia after months of supply chain disruptions, according to a new Supply Chain Disruptions report sponsored by JLL.

According to this report, there are several companies operating in the retail and manufacturing sectors that have already decided to partially or completely redistribute their production, and the data shows that the new European beneficiaries of the “reorientation” are Central Europe and Romania, and the European borders with Turkey and Morocco are also on the radar.

This trend follows a pandemic that has caused disruption in distribution networks and serious problems in ports and airports, so companies have begun to choose “reshoring” as an attempt to solve the problem of disruption in supply chains.

JLL also expects that the shortage of land and labor will boost demand in Central Europe, from the primary market to the secondary and tertiary markets, the latter strategically located.

Data from Flexport (a global logistics platform) shows that the average container flight from Asia to Europe has almost doubled since 2019, and Buck Consultants International (BCI) research confirms the same as JLL: more than 60% of US and European companies plan to send part of their products back to their country of origin.

Given the existing transport networks and logistics gateways, it can be said that goods will circulate primarily along two distribution corridors: the traditional European dorsal (from central England to northern Italy) and the emerging “Black Sea banana” connecting Budapest. to the Black Sea.

See also  REN's profit fell 10.1% to September to € 68.4 million - Energy

Marlene Tavares, Head of Retail Investment and Logistics at JLL, explains: “The discussion about nearshoring (where operations move to a country close to the country of origin, as opposed to offshoring) is not new. Rising wages in places with low-cost production and increased risk from climate change, strikes and accidents such as the blockade of the Suez Canal have sparked controversy over the issue over the past decade.

However, a more favorable cost-risk ratio and the loss of many manufacturing infrastructures in Europe continued to give the Asian continent an advantage in hosting large distribution centers and manufacturing a wide range of products. This scenario is now changing due to the recent situation as well as new consumption habits. In this context, Portugal has a competitive advantage due to its very attractive geographic location and demographics, which place us prominently in the European Neighborhood Strategy,” he emphasizes.

Continue Reading

Trending