Connect with us

World

Rani attracts thousands of tourists to Bangladesh. Everyone wants to see what the smallest cow in the world could be – News

Published

on

The 23-month-old dwarf cow has become the star of India, and dozens of newspapers and TV channels have turned their attention to her. Rani’s photos on social media have caused a stir among tourists.

Despite the suspension of public transport across the country due to record infections and deaths from the coronavirus, people rode rickshaws to the city of Charigram.

Rani is 66 inches long and weighs only 26 pounds. The owners claim that she is 10 centimeters shorter than the smallest cow listed in the Guinness Book of Records.

M.A. Hassan Howlader, manager of Shikor Agro, uses the counter to prove to visitors that Rani is smaller than Manikyam, a cow from the Indian state of Kerala that is currently the world record holder and stood at 61 centimeters in 2014. Guinness World Records Organization.

Rani attracts thousands of tourists to Bangladesh. Everyone wants to see what the smallest cow in the world can be.

créditos: AFP or licensors

“data-title =” Rani attracts thousands of tourists to Bangladesh. Everyone wants to see what the smallest cow in the world can be – Rani attracts thousands of tourists to Bangladesh. Everyone wants to see what the smallest cow in the world can be – SAPO Viagens “>

créditos: AFP or licensors

“People come from afar despite the conclusion,” Howlader told AFP, adding that the Guinness World Records organization has promised to make a decision within three months. “In the past three days alone, more than 15,000 people have come to see Rani,” he said.

Rani belongs to the species whose meat is very popular in Bangladesh. The rest of the cows on the farm are twice your size.

According to Sajedul Islam, the state veterinarian in the region, Rani’s growth is a consequence of inbreeding and is unlikely to grow.

See also  Portugal is in the Top 25 of the most powerful national brands in the world.
Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

World

Suitcases containing the remains of two children sold at auction in New Zealand

Published

on

New Zealand police said the remains of two children were found in suitcases bought at an auction in Auckland, New Zealand’s largest city.

Inspector Tofilau Faamanuia Waaelua said that the bodies of the victims, aged between five and ten years, were probably hidden for several years in two suitcases of the same size.

“The nature of the discovery makes the investigation challenging, especially given the time that has elapsed between death and discovery,” Waaelua said.

The family found the bags after purchasing a trailer full of items sold in bulk from a warehouse, with an official stating that the family in question was unrelated to the death but “understandably distraught at the find.”

Police, who also called Interpol, are searching the trailer for other household items and personal items to identify the victims.

The warehouse and property where the bags were found were thoroughly inspected by a forensic team.

“We are doing our best to identify the victims” in order to bring to justice the perpetrator or perpetrators of the deaths of these children, Waaelua said.

See also  Turkmenistan says no case has been reported since pandemic began - News
Continue Reading

World

Arctic. The next point of tension with Putin after the war in Ukraine? – Observer

Published

on

You have free access to all Observer articles as a subscriber.

Svalbard is an icy archipelago with a population of less than 3,000 and it is essential to carry weapons when leaving the cities due to the risk of polar bear attacks. It is the northernmost permanently inhabited region on the entire globe. And this is also Achilles’ heel of NATO in the Arcticwhat did you once call it Professor of Security Studies.

Formally, Svalbard is under the sovereignty of Norway, but thanks to a century-old treaty, many other countries have the right to exploit its natural resources. In particular, Russia, which has been mining in the region for years, often employs Ukrainian workers, mostly from the Donbass. In the abandoned city of Pyramidyou can still find a bust of Lenin and slogan which says: “Communism is our goal.”

Entrance to the abandoned city of Pyramiden, where Soviet mines worked for decades.

Generic Image Group via Getty

This article is for our subscribers only: subscribe now and get unlimited reading and other benefits. If you are already a subscriber start session here. If you think this message is wrong, please contact our support team.

See also  'Help, I can't move my arms': new case reopens US police negligence debate
Continue Reading

World

Saudi Arabia: Woman sentenced to over 30 years in prison for using Twitter

Published

on

Salma al-Shehab, a Saudi student at the University of Leeds, UK, was sentenced to 34 years in prison for having a Twitter account, following and distributing posts by dissidents and anti-Saudi activists when she returned home this summer. on holiday.

Initially, according to The Guardian, Salma was sentenced to three years in prison for the “crime” of using the website to “cause public disorder and destabilize civil and national security.” But on Monday, after a prosecutor’s request to consider other crimes, the court of second instance issued a new sentence: 34 years in prison, followed by a 34-year travel ban.

According to an English newspaper that had access to a translation of court records, the new allegations include an allegation that Shehab “helped those who seek to cause civil unrest and destabilize civil and national security by following his Twitter accounts” and sharing his tweets.

In a brief social media consultation for a 34-year-old Saudi mother of two, Shehab appears to have no activist profile, while on Instagram she reveals her more personal life, presenting herself as an oral hygienist and doctoral student. student. Twitter already has shares of Saudi dissidents living in exile asking for the release of political prisoners in the kingdom.

The Guardian on Twitter declined to comment on the case, clashing with journalist Stephanie Kirchgessner over the possible influence of Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, who owns more than 5% of the social network through Kingdom Holding.

The case comes just weeks after Joe Biden’s heavily criticized visit to Saudi Arabia, during which several activists confronted the President of the United States of America about various human rights violations by the regime of Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

See also  Covid-19: British wait for third dose after Omicron warning - News

Continue Reading

Trending