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Insurance may cover looting, but consumers will pay

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Insurance may cover looting, but consumers will pay

Randle Frankel, who runs a commercial property insurance broker with clients throughout Los Angeles County, could only shake his head when several people looted shops over the weekend saying this would not hurt anyone because the business was insured.

Yes, most retailers are protected for such criminal activities, Frankel told me, but not necessarily for total damage or loss. As with all insurance, it depends on how much coverage they buy.

In addition, responsibility does not stop with insurance companies.

“If operators pay claims for losses of hundreds of millions, they will try and compensate,” Frankel said. “There will be consequences. Rates will go up. “

Higher insurance rates will definitely be passed on to customers in the form of higher retail prices, which means, going forward, higher out-of-pocket costs for shoes, clothing and other items obtained without a five-finger discount.

In other words, looting is not a victimless crime, because some have tried to argue in defense of such behavior.

This has very real consequences for business owners and, in turn, their customers. In the long run, we all pay.

“In my experience, after every event like this, there will be an increase in prices,” Frankel said. “Rates must go up.”

If it needs to be underlined, theft and vandalism have nothing to do with mostly peaceful protests over the death of George Floyd. This is criminal behavior, stop completely.

My colleagues Sam Dean, Laurence Darmiento and Ronald D. White did a good job of describing how not all landlords need commercial tenants to insure their inventory.

As a general rule, they report, small business owners with up to 100 employees can spend $ 1,200 per year on protection. Larger companies, I say, pay significantly more than that.

But this is an extraordinary time. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, many businesses let their insurance policies pass or reduce coverage because they have no money in for months.

“Many of my clients have cut back,” said Gino Mattunts, a commercial insurance broker based in Glendale. “There have been many cancellations.”

He also said theft insurance often came with a large deductible to make protection more affordable. The shoe shop owner who was destroyed by looters, in other words, may be on the hook for most of the loss.

Mattunts said, the possibility of insurance companies will issue new requirements for businesses in connection with the surge in theft and damage to this property.

“Think about what it’s like to walk at night in downtown L.A.,” he said. “Everywhere you look, you see a heavy steel gate. That’s because of past experience in the area. We can see that in the future throughout the city. “

Karl Susman, a commercial insurance broker at Brentwood, agrees that high security measures are possible.

However, first, he expects insurance companies to try to reduce their risk by adding business deductibles, making business owners absorb more financial risk.

They will also stop issuing new policies until they can take into account this latest development, Susman said.

I ask whether local businesses have no risk of looting that is reflected in their policies since the Rodney King riots in 1992, which caused about $ 1 billion in property damage. Hasn’t that changed the insurance landscape?

“No,” Susman answered. “That hardly makes a blip in terms of level and deductibles because it’s so local.”

“What we see now is different,” he said. Recent property damage in some of the region’s most prosperous commercial districts far exceeds, in terms of geography, what was experienced by business owners in 1992. Similar dynamics occur in national commercial centers.

“It’s more like a brush fire,” Susman explained. “This is very broad, and the industry will respond with new steps.”

For consumers, the fire brush metaphor is a good one. Major fires in recent years may not have caused everyone’s homes to burn, but it has changed the way home insurance is offered in California.

Several insurance companies left the market, concluding that the danger of a country’s fire would only get worse. That still raises rates and reduces for almost all homeowners to reflect the reality of climate change that we are living in trouble.

“With home insurance, the tariff continues to rise because we are experiencing loss after loss after loss,” Susman said.

“We can now see the same thing for commercial insurance, and businesses will provide higher costs to customers.”

Mitch Davis, a commercial insurance consultant based in Austin, Texas, told me that no coverage service provider will now begin to weigh heavier theft and vandalism in setting rates.

“Insurers have already included exceptions for infectious diseases due to coronavirus,” he said. “We have never really seen that before. The same thing will happen because of looting. “

His advice for businesses that lack money is not to file relatively small damage claims, such as broken windows.

“By absorbing the loss, you might be able to avoid a rate hike in the short term,” Davis said. “In the long run, tariffs and deductions will rise.”

Tony Cignarale, California’s deputy commissioner of consumer services insurance, said the possibility of tariff increases for businesses – and thus higher prices for consumers – was very real.

“We are monitoring minute by minute and trying to find out where rates will go in the future,” he said.

Spoiler warning: Above.

Enjoy new kicks, looters. We all pay for it.

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Coronavirus Effects: Towns force back immediately after Alameda County suspends outdoor eating less than new California suggestions

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Coronavirus Impact: Cities push back after Alameda County suspends outdoor dining under new California guidelines
ALAMEDA COUNTY, Calif. (KGO) — In the East Bay, it is really a big phase back again for reopening designs in Alameda County. Advice from the state is forcing the county to shut down outside dining right away — but not every person is prepared to comply.

Octavio Guzman owns La Penca Azul in Alameda. He states retaining his restaurant afloat hasn’t been straightforward, in particular in Alameda County exactly where outdoor eating is now off the desk, suspended less than a thirty day period after it was authorized to reopen.

“It truly is really baffling, factors transform right away,” stated Guzman.

Outside eating was permitted beneath Alameda County overall health rules, but the county announced the state’s tightening of restrictions Friday night time. Dining places, wineries and bars can only offer you travel-thru, decide up or supply less than the condition purchase.

Below the county’s reopening approach, outdoor dining, alongside with retail enterprises and summer schools, had been permitted to reopen on June 29.

The state’s advice prohibits outside eating in non-variance counties, which includes Alameda County.

Outside dining was nevertheless happening at Ole’s Waffle Store in Alameda but Robin Wright and her buddies who get the job done in food service weren’t pleased.

“If we are reducing back again on outside dining, servers and bartenders may possibly have to go again attempting to count on the government for unemployment,” reported Wright.

Linked: Oakland’s Fairyland in money hassle, doubtful of reopening amid coronavirus pandemic

Ken Monize had just opened his outside patio but is now getting rid of most of the tables.

“Its absolute chaos, I’m not confident what we’re heading to do, but I can tell you our management below is incompetent,” mentioned Monize.

Ken Monize is pondering about his next go probably out of the county. “I may well relocate, I may perhaps run for mayor, but we require a transform,” Monize explained.

View: Alameda restaurant entrepreneurs categorical aggravation just after county orders suspension of out of doors dining

Other cities are picking to defy the get.

The city of Hayward issued this statement, “The Metropolis of Hayward intends to go via with the street closure function as planned and will support regional places to eat who choose to participate- regardless of whether by giving out of doors eating provider or just takeout assistance.”

Livermore and Dublin won’t remove outside eating possibly.

Some city leaders like John Marchand, mayor of Livermore, suggests that is not a legal buy and are proceeding with the avenue closures to permit out of doors eating.

“To get a push release, not an formal order, but a push launch late Friday night is seriously inconsistent and really unfair to the companies that actually made a considerable investment decision,” Marchand explained.

“We had planned to near To start with Avenue, we are not going to adjust individuals plans mainly because those people strategies, as I realize it, are nevertheless dependable with the legal orders that are in location,” Marchand included.

Associated: Berkeley epidemiologist ‘cautiously concerned’ above rise in COVID-19 conditions in Alameda County

Sapporo Japanese Cuisine is a family members-owned enterprise in Livermore and the planned occasion to shut down the streets make it possible for them to set tables out for their buyers.

Nicholas Yoo, the supervisor, explained customers have been contacting and messaging them bewildered on regardless of whether they’re open up for outside eating or not.

“Incredibly last minute, incredibly unorganized, and just brought on a whole lot of confusion,” Yoo explained.

Yoo claimed a few city council users frequented to individually present their assistance.

“Mark Salinas did arrive and other customers of the city as properly and they dropped off distinct gifts and just gave us verbal aid. It was good to see that little affirmation from the council users on their own and they bodily arrived in and they walked by and gave their particular aid,” Yoo explained.

COVID-19 Threat CALCULATOR: Quiz by yourself on the most secure, most risky matters you can do as California reopens

Close to the corner on B Street, operator Michale LeBlanc of Playt Restaurant and Bar explained he was so perplexed, he didn’t know if he’d even open after months of organizing.

“I did not know if I was heading to open up up nowadays till maybe 30 to 40 minutes beforehand,” LeBlanc explained.

He introduced in employees and bought further foodstuff.

“We acquired food stuff, we acquired further meals I kinda changed the menu up just a minor bit. I bought umbrellas, I bought umbrella stands I bought trash cans, I received plates,” LeBlanc stated.

LeBlanc explained he’s not upset simply because the county and every person is just seeking out for everyone’s health, but he desires far better interaction.

“I am hoping that the town, point out, county – they all get collectively based on what took place this weekend and we have some very clear pointers as we go into future weekend,” LeBlanc reported.

Life Soon after COVID-19: Here’s what eating places, gyms, faculties, sports will glimpse like when they reopen

An Alameda County spokesperson explained in a assertion Saturday:

“We are shifting towards getting a variance from the condition and a letter of assistance for a variance is on the agenda for up coming Tuesday’s supervisors meeting.”

As of Saturday afternoon, Alameda County experienced 7,725 constructive cases of COVID-19, the optimum quantity of situations of any county in the Bay Spot.

CALIFORNIA REOPENING: Here is what is open, closed in Bay Location

If you have a problem or remark about the coronavirus pandemic, submit yours through the variety beneath or here.

Get the most recent news, details and movies about the novel coronavirus pandemic below

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Starting grid and race preview for Styrian Grand Prix

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A dramatic start to the Formula One season looks poised to continue with the Styrian Grand Prix at the Red Bull Ring on Sunday.

Torrential rain had qualifying in doubt on Saturday, but fans were rewarded for their patience with a thrilling session in troublesome track conditions once the action began after a delay.

The second of two consecutive races in Spielberg will see Lewis Hamilton and Max Verstappen, two men looking to bounce back from disappointing outings at the Austrian Grand Prix, occupy the front row.

Hamilton has not won in his last four attempts at this circuit and, while the weather may be better on race day, there is potential for another lively grand prix after last week’s entertaining start.

 

WHAT HAPPENED IN QUALIFYING

A magnificent late effort in the rain saw Hamilton knock Verstappen off the top of the standings in the final stages of Q3, ultimately finishing 1.216 seconds ahead of the Dutchman.

Carlos Sainz claimed an excellent third for a McLaren team who have momentum, with Valtteri Bottas – the winner last time out – having to settle for fourth ahead of Esteban Ocon. Alex Albon qualified seventh but will start sixth after a grid penalty for Lando Norris.

Ferrari had another difficult qualifying, with Sebastian Vettel and Charles Leclerc coming 10th and 11th respectively, before it got worse when the Monegasque dropped to 14th when he received a penalty for impeding Daniil Kvyat.

THE STARTING GRID 

1. Lewis Hamilton (Mercedes) 2. Max Verstappen (Red Bull)
3. Carlos Sainz (McLaren)  4. Valtteri Bottas (Mercedes)
5. Esteban Ocon (Renault) 6. Alex Albon (Red Bull)
7. Pierre Gasly (Alpha Tauri) 8. Daniel Ricciardo (Renault)
9. Lando Norris (McLaren) 10. Sebastian Vettel (Ferrari)
11. George Russell (Williams)  12. Lance Stroll (Racing Point)
13. Daniil Kvyat (Alpha Tauri) 14. Charles Leclerc (Ferrari)
15. Kevin Magnussen (Haas) 16. Kimi Raikkonen (Alfa Romeo)
17. Sergio Perez (Racing Point) 18. Nicholas Latifi (Williams)
19. Antonio Giovinazzi (Alfa Romeo) 20. Romain Grosjean (Haas)

 

STYRIAN GRAND PRIX TALKING POINTS

Red Bull have a score to settle with Mercedes after last week and will hope Verstappen can take the fight to Hamilton at their home circuit, where the Dutchman won in 2019.

Verstappen was denied what looked to be a certain podium and a possible challenge to the two Mercedes when he retired last week, while Alex Albon’s late charge for victory was derailed when he was knocked off track by Hamilton, who received a time penalty.

Red Bull are therefore desperate for points, as is Hamilton, who will be glad to see team-mate Bottas begin three places behind him as he looks to halt the Finn’s early momentum. Sainz, meanwhile, will look to give McLaren consecutive podiums for the first time in eight years.

The race pace of Ferrari, who have not won at this circuit since 2003, will again be under the spotlight. Leclerc’s second-place last week masked serious issues with their car, and while they have brought upgrades to round two, the Scuderia start in an unenviable position.

WHAT THE DRIVERS SAID

Lewis Hamilton (pole): “That last lap for me was really as close to perfect as I could really get it in those conditions. I don’t know how it comes across on the cameras, but it is the hardest conditions that we ever drive in. I still have to do the job and these guys are no pushovers, so it is going to require a perfect job from myself and the team.”

Max Verstappen (2nd): “My final lap could have been a little better and I had a four-wheel drift over the last kerb but still it would not have been good enough to beat Lewis. [Sunday] in the dry will be a different day and hopefully we will be quick enough to fight for the win. Starting on the front row gives us a good opportunity to collect some good points and hopefully we can give Mercedes a hard time.”

Carlos Sainz (3rd): “The car was better than it was last year in the wet. I am starting P3, so there will be opportunities hopefully and maybe we can grab another podium. But it will be difficult – we finished P3 last weekend because Hamilton and Albon collided – what is important is that this year with this car, if the others fail, we are a bit closer to the podium.”

Valtteri Bottas (4th): “My front-right brake was glazing throughout the qualifying so I couldn’t really maximise the potential of the car under braking, which is really important for the confidence in the wet conditions. That made it quite tricky and it was disappointing. We haven’t done a race distance, obviously, in practice [but] we know the car is quick so I’m looking forward to it.”

Sebastian Vettel (10th): “Unfortunately we didn’t have the speed, we had a lot of aquaplaning in the car, struggled to get the tyres to work, in particular the front, so it wasn’t easy to judge. We had a lot of front locking, a lot of aquaplaning down the straight. In the last lap, I tried to do a bit more and risk everything and it didn’t work. I had to try, but not great, obviously.”

George Russell (11th): “It felt incredible. It was a real buzz driving – I was giving it everything I had. If somebody said we’d have been a tenth away from the Ferraris [to get] into Q3, there is no way I would have believed it. It’s not our true pace but it was great and a real boost for the hard work of the whole team. I’m really happy. Let’s see what we can do on Sunday.”

 

CHAMPIONSHIP STANDINGS

Drivers

1. Valtteri Bottas (Mercedes) – 25
2. Charles Leclerc (Ferrari) – 18
3. Lando Norris (McLaren) – 16
4. Lewis Hamilton (Mercedes) – 12
5. Carlos Sainz (McLaren) – 10

Constructors

1. Mercedes – 37
2. McLaren – 26
3. Ferrari – 19
4. Racing Point – 8
5. Alpha Tauri – 6

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Tesla Model Y Price Drops — New Cost of Ownership vs. Lexus RX

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Tesla Model Y Price Drops — New Cost of Ownership vs. Lexus RX

Cars


Published on July 11th, 2020 |
by Zachary Shahan





July 11th, 2020 by Zachary Shahan 


Tesla has dropped the price of the Model Y by a few thousand dollars, with the starting price now at $49,990*. Meanwhile, the Performance trim is down to $59,990 and has more features included by default as well as 11 miles more range.

$50,000 is a lot of money for a vehicle (unless you’re rich enough that it’s not), but what’s most notable with the Model Y is how much better it is than anything else in its class with regards to performance (both its 0–60 mph time or 0–30 mph time and its handling), infotainment (Tesla’s infotainment system is second to none, and it’s not even close), driver-assist features (Tesla Autopilot is second to none, and it’s not even close), and cost of operation.

This Model Y price drop provides an opportunity to get to something I haven’t done yet — cost of ownership analyses for the Model Y compared to its closest competitors (even though, as I noted above, there really are no close competitors on the market right now).

To start with, here’s a look at 5-year cost of ownership forecasts for the Tesla Model Y versus the Lexus RX:

As always, assumptions are a big deal in a cost of ownership analysis. People have widely different lifestyles and prices of several inputs vary by region. Furthermore, you may have a different estimate of what you expect in the next 5 years with regards to gas prices, your personal electricity/charging prices, the resale values of these SUVs, and maintenance costs. As always, I encourage you to steal my sheet (copy it) and put in the numbers that fit best for your life and your expectations about the future.

According to my best guess on some averages, the Tesla Model Y Long Range is absurdly cheaper than the Lexus RX and even the Model Y Performance is cheaper — despite having more cargo capacity, better acceleration, a better passenger experience, better infotainment, and greater safety. Why would anyone buy a new Lexus RX in 2020? I have no clue. Actually, I take that back — people still buy this and other models because of inertia. Most people have never sat in a Tesla. Most people have never driven a Tesla. Most people have never compared the specs and costs of a Tesla Model Y and a Lexus RX. They go back to Lexus because they’re familiar with Lexus. They have a notion in their heads about Lexus being a great brand that they acquired years ago, without the taste of Tesla to put it in context. Now, as for anyone who goes and test drives a Tesla Model Y and a Lexus RX and chooses a Lexus RX — that person, if they exist, baffles me.

As a final note, keep in mind that Tesla still isn’t selling the lowest cost version of the Model Y, the Model Y Standard Range Plus, which may start around $40,000 once available. Ooo, baby!

Related stories:

*Interestingly, I think it’s worth noting finally that someone got a hold of CEO Elon Musk at some point and made him change his policy on pricing. He used to prefer rounding the price up or down to the closest thousand or at least even hundred, and noted at least once that he found pricing like this annoying. I agree — just make the price an even $50,000. Though, dropping $10 off the price somehow moves minds — everyone knows it, but it still works — and sometime back Tesla decided to play the game and do pricing like $49,990. Frankly, perhaps more than anything else, this makes me think that even Tesla gets concerned about demand to some degree. Dropping the price by $3,000 passes along the same implication.

Want to buy a Tesla Model 3, Y, S, or X? Feel free to use my referral code to get some free Supercharging miles with your purchase: https://ts.la/zachary63404. No pressure. You can also get a $250 discount on Tesla solar with that code. 

 

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Tags: EV TCO, Tesla, Tesla Model Y, Tesla Model Y Long Range, Tesla Model Y Long Range price, Tesla Model Y Long Range TCO, Tesla Model Y Performance, Tesla Model Y Performance price, Tesla Model Y Performance TCO, Tesla Model Y prices, Tesla Model Y TCO, Tesla Model Y Total Cost of Ownership, Tesla prices





About the Author

Zachary Shahan is tryin’ to help society help itself one word at a time. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director, chief editor, and CEO. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, Canada, and Curaçao.

Zach has long-term investments in Tesla [TSLA] — after years of covering solar and EVs, he simply has a lot of faith in this company and feels like it is a good cleantech company to invest in. But he does not offer (explicitly or implicitly) investment advice of any sort on Tesla or any other company.









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