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Hiltzik: UC won a huge victory in publishing open access science

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Hiltzik: UC won a huge victory in publishing open access science

The University of California, which has struggled for years against the business model of profit-seeking scientific publishers, has just won a big win: a four-year deal that will make the content of more than 2,700 journals published by Springer Nature available to UC without subscription fees.

In exchange, UC writers will pay fees for Springer Nature after their articles are accepted for publication in these journals. The fee will allow anyone to read and use published papers for free. The contract runs until 2023.

The agreement announced this week unites system of the leading research universities in the country and the second largest scientific and technical publisher in the world. This is a big step forward in the campaign by UC – as well as academic institutions throughout the US and the world – to cancel the business model of existing nonprofit academic publishers.

This is a big agreement. This shows the world that the open access publishing model that we have promoted is appropriate for all sizes of publishers, including large non-profit commercial publishers.

Jeffrey MacKie-Mason, UC university librarian

In this campaign UC uses heavy weaponry, as its source it is estimated that 10% of all studies produced in the U.S. The University accounts for about 2% of all content published by the journal Springer Nature.

But universities have struggled to manage a subscription budget of around $ 50 million per year, according to Ivy Anderson, executive director of the UC California Digital Library.

As subscription fees continue to increase inevitably, squeezing resources for other services, UC, like other institutions, starts looking for ways to get more value from its expenses while expanding the spread of its research.

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Prior to this, UC reached open access agreements with a number of smaller publishers, but none were on the Springer Nature scale.

“This is a big deal,” said University Librarian Jeffrey MacKie-Mason, who is also a Berkeley economics professor. “This shows the world that the open access publishing model that we have promoted is appropriate for all sizes of publishers, including large nonprofit commercial publishers.”

Traditionally, publishers accept papers for publication for free but charge steep subscription fees. The model means, in practice, that academic users incur costs for conducting their research and once again reading their own papers in print or online. This model also builds a financial wall between writers and fellow scientists, who also have to pay to read published papers.

The Springer Nature deal effectively puts the world’s largest scientific and technical publisher, Elsevier, on the sidewalk. UC has struggled since 2018 to change an 11 million dollar subscription contract with Elsevier to an open access model.

Both parties were unable to reach an agreement despite the extended game of brinkmanship. In March 2019, after failing to reach an agreement on open access, UC ended its subscription to 2,500 Elsevier academic journals, including some of the most important publications in the world such as Lancet and Cell.

Elsevier allowed the faculty, students, and UC staff to continue to access the journal until mid-July, when it finally cut off their access to most new material. (Content from 2018 and earlier remains available.)

The conflict reflects Elsevier’s generally harsh approach to the demand for open access, which has spread throughout the world; users in Germany have been disconnected the publisher has reached an agreement with users in the Netherlands, Sweden and several research universities restoring access that was terminated while allowing several open access rights.

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An Elsevier spokesman called the Springer Nature agreement “good news for researchers and the shared goals of open access are progressing.”

He said the agreement “shows what is possible with the UC system as we continue our dialogue … towards a sustainable solution.” UC said it was not currently negotiating a new contract with Elsevier, even though the two sides had continued “the conversation.”

“We have been looking for some common ground so we can negotiate,” MacKie-Mason said.

Unlike Elsevier, Springer Nature proactively adheres to the open access model. It largely recognizes the model as the future of academic publishing in a world where financial constraints increasingly afflict academic institutions of all sizes.

“Open access is at the core of our strategy,” Carrie Webster, vice president of open access at the publisher, told me. “We have long believed that it is in the best interest of research. The open access business model is an important step towards achieving the future of open science.”

UC, for its part, is committed to opening access in 2013, in recognition that it is the best way to “disseminate research and scholarships as widely as possible.”

According to Memorandum of Understanding released this week, UC authors will be able to publish their articles open-access in most Springer Nature journals.

This arrangement does not include the journals Nature and Nature-branded, which was obtained by Springer in Berlin in 2015 and which is ranked among the most prestigious scientific journals in the world. But the contract anticipates that the journals will be included in the regulation in 2022.

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Meanwhile, UC will have permanent access to more than 2,200 journals published under the print of Springer, Palgrave, Adis and Macmillan.

According to the arrangement, UC is expected to cover the first $ 1,000 of the cost of publishing Springer articles per paper, with researchers contributing the excess from foundation grants or other sources. The university will bear the excess for researchers without adequate facilities.

Researchers who prefer to publish under the traditional subscription model will be able to opt out of the open access arrangement if they publish in the journal Springer Nature which is “hybrid” – that is, accept papers on both models.

Overall, UC is expected to pay at least 5% less for Springer Nature than under the previous contract. Anderson and MacKie-Mason refused to say how much the university had paid before, but said that it was less than the $ 11 million spent on subscription and Elsevier’s fees.

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Language policy in party election programs

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Language policy in party election programs

Opening the last week of the election campaign and having voted in advance, I decided to share the results of my reading of the electoral programs (or similar) of the main parties in relation to official languages ​​(Portuguese) and with official recognition (Portuguese Sign Language, LGP and Mirandese). I limited the analysis (but not the reading) to the four most voted parties in 2019: PS, PSD, BE, and PCP; I used “língua”, “português”, “gestual portuguesa” (LGP), “mirandês” and their synonyms as search expressions. The goal is to understand the importance that each side attaches to language(s) and language policy.

PCP Presents Electoral Commitmentwhere it shapes the 2022 elections and resumes Election program for 2019, of 114 pages. In this “language” appears five times, twice in support of “learning [gratuito] Portuguese as mother tongue among expatriate communities” and three in “Valuing the Portuguese language and culture”. LGP and Mirandese do not occur. The documents use the spelling standard of 1945 (as well as CDS-PP Electoral Commitment, 14 pages).

Not Election program 2022-2026, from the British Empire, on 203 pages, “language” occurs six times, which is associated with increased teaching and access to LGP, with immigrant communities (Portuguese and native languages, in bilingual education) and once with reference to the free teaching of Portuguese for second generation immigrants.

OUR Electoral program 2022 PSD, 165 pages, never mentioned Mirandese or LGP; the Portuguese language is mentioned seven times, and the document contains a theme called “Language”, which proclaims: “Portuguese is an expression of our collective identity and of Portugal’s presence on a global scale, as well as differences in the use of the Portuguese language. don’t impoverish it (…) The attempt at orthographic standardization offered no advantage in the face of a globalized world, so PSD advocates assessing the real impact of the new [??!!] spelling convention” [sic] (CDS-PP is strongly in favor of abolishing it, and I would like to see some of the studies evaluating its impact.) In another paragraph, starting with the words “Portugal can never neglect lusophony”. [sic], advocates “concrete efforts (…) to raise the status of Portuguese to an official language of the United Nations” (only PSD uses the term “lusophonia”). The remaining references refer to basic education and immigrant communities, as well as to Portuguese-speaking African countries.

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Not PS campaign program, 122 pages of compact text, the search expression “language” occurs 26 times. There is talk of LGP dissemination and interpretation in government services; “Mirandes” is not found. The role of the Portuguese language in establishing Portugal in the world is clearly appreciated through its internationalization in the context of strengthening the CPLP, namely in connection with the International Portuguese Language Institute, relations with UNESCO and OEI. , under the control of the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Culture. The teaching of Portuguese as a native and non-native language (for emigrants and immigrants) is carried out at all levels of education. The text contains several concrete proposals for action.

Of course, much more can be said, and reading this text is not intended to devalue (rather, promote) the reading of election programs. The choice is up to everyone. Voting is free and voting is an act of citizenship.

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The Portuguese government plans to double spending on research and development

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The Portuguese government plans to double spending on research and development

The leaders want national R&D spending to be 3% of GDP by 2030.

The Portuguese government has agreed to nearly double the country’s spending on research and development by 2030, the EU’s long-term goal of 3% of GDP.

The December 29 resolution called for government spending on R&D to reach 1% of GDP by 2030, with the remaining 2% added to private spending.

In 2020, public and private spending on R&D was 0.66% and 0.96% of GDP, respectively, which means that public spending will more than halve and private spending will double.

With rising costs, the government has promised reforms and modernization of the R&D sector in Portugal. He said the resolution would support the promotion of a culture of innovation and science and help stimulate the restructuring of the knowledge-based economy.

Last year, Government says Portugal’s spending on research and development has increased five years in a row, reaching a record 3.3.2 billion by 2020. He said the growth was mainly driven by the business sector.

The EU as a whole has set a goal of spending 3% of its GDP on research and development, but for decades it has struggled for more than 2% to cover real costs. By 2020, R&D spending has decreased by $1 billion., but it increased to 2.3% of GDP as the economy contracted due to the government-19 epidemic.

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Former Portugal international Lima Pereira dies at 69

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Former Portugal international Lima Pereira dies at 69

Lima Pereira, the Portuguese international who distinguished himself in the 1980s with Porto, died this Saturday at the age of 69 after a long illness.

At one time he was one of the best Portuguese players in the central defender position. António José Lima Pereira was born in Povoa de Varzim on February 1, 1952. He graduated from Varzim and played there in the early years of his senior career. In 1978 he moved to Porto and his journey was very successful. His name is associated with some of the most brilliant moments in the history of the dragon emblem, such as winning the European Cup and Intercontinental Cup in 1987 and the European Super Cup in 1988. In 11 seasons (265 games), he also won 4 championships. , three national Supercups and 2 Portuguese Cups. He ended his career with Maya in 1991. “I knew how to exemplify the values ​​of Porto,” Pinto da Costa wrote in a social media post.

Lima Pereira, who represented the national team 20 times, suffered a stroke in 2006.

testimony
Jorge Amaral, former Porto player
“He personified the spirit of Porto and the North. He was a friend of his friends and had an enviable sense of humor. A loss he regrets.”

Octavio Machado, former player and coach of FC Porto
“A champion who celebrated all who had the honor of living with him. We already miss him.”

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