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Hong Kongers defy coronavirus restrictions to protest national security law

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Hong Kong lawmaker: Our young are fighting for their future

Police fired tear gas at the crowds less than an hour after the start of the march, which did not receive official authorization and went against coronavirus social distancing restrictions, which ban groups of more than eight people meeting. An online stream showed protesters throwing objects at police.

Protesters had begun gathering around midday in Causeway Bay, a busy shopping district, despite a heavy police presence across Hong Kong Island. Attempts to claim the march was a permitted “health talk” were unsuccessful, and police quickly declared the protest illegal and ordered people to disperse.

Several thousand people marched nevertheless, chanting slogans which became a familiar refrain in the city during the over six-months of anti-government unrest, including “Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our times.”

Others chanted “Hong Kong independence, the only way out,” and others flew blue, pro-independence flags. Such activity could likely be illegal under the proposed security law. Beijing has often expressed outrage over separatist sentiment in the city, which remains a niche issue but gained influence during last year’s unrest.

Asked if she was worried about the potential repercussions of chanting such slogans, Macy Wong, 26, said that she was comfortable doing so, as others were doing the same.

“Independence is Hong Kong’s long-term goal,” Wong said. “Maybe it’s not feasible in the near future, but that’s ultimately what we want.”

Anti-sedition law

China announced Thursday that it plans to introduce a new national security law in Hong Kong — bypassing the city’s legislature — which is expected to ban sedition, secession and subversion against Beijing. It will also enable mainland Chinese national security agencies to operate in the city for the first time.

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The announcement sparked immediate outcry from opposition lawmakers in Hong Kong, human rights groups and multiple international governments.

It also sent chills through the city’s financial markets with Hong Kong’s benchmark Hang Seng Index plummeting more than 5% on Friday, its worst one-day percentage drop since July 2015.

Beijing’s move implies much greater intervention in the city, which has largely been allowed to manage its own affairs since the former British colony became a semi-autonomous region of China more than 20 years ago.

“It is the end of ‘one country, two systems’,” said Dennis Kwok, a pro-democracy lawmaker, referring to the principle by which Hong Kong has retained limited democracy and civil liberties since coming under Chinese control. “(They are) completely destroying Hong Kong.”

The move is likely to fuel further anger and protests in the city, which was rocked by over six months of increasingly violent anti-government unrest last year.

Those protests began over proposed law that would allow for extradition to mainland China, but expanded to include calls for an independent inquiry into police brutality and greater democracy.

The legislation, expected to be passed by china’s National People’s Congress (NPC) later this month, is set to be introduced in Hong Kong through a rarely used constitutional method that will bypass Hong Kong’s legislature.

The law will have drastic effects on large swathes of Hong Kong society, from the city’s political sphere to media, education and international business.

Chinese officials and state media defended the law as vital to protecting national security in the wake of last year’s protests and a 17-year failure by the Hong Kong government to pass similar legislation, since the last effort was met with mass protests in 2003.

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“National security is the bedrock underpinning a country’s stability. Safeguarding national security serves the fundamental interests of all Chinese people, including our HK compatriots,” NPC spokesman Zhang Yesui told a news conference in Beijing on Thursday.

Pedestrians walk under a television screen in Hong Kong on May 21, 2020, showing a news broadcast of footage from Beijing of Chinese President Xi Jinping (C) at the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference.

Biggest blow since handover

Hong Kong has always prided itself on following the rule of law, with an independent judiciary and civil liberties far beyond what is allowed across the border in mainland China.

These rights are enshrined within the Basic Law — the city’s de facto constitution — and guaranteed (in theory) by an agreement between China and the United Kingdom when Hong Kong was handed over to Chinese rule in 1997. Hong Kong, unlike China, is also party to international treaties guaranteeing various civil liberties.

Businesses fear the worst for Hong Kong's future

The new law challenges all of this. By criminalizing such a broad swath of ill-defined acts, it could give the authorities leeway to go after the city’s opposition as they see fit.

In China, sweeping national security laws have been used to target human rights activists, lawyers, journalists and pro-democracy campaigners. Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, who died in 2017 after more than a decade behind bars, was convicted of “inciting subversion of state power.”

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo condemned the proposed national security law, warning that the passage of the legislation would be a “death knell” for Hong Kong’s autonomy.

“The United States strongly urges Beijing to reconsider its disastrous proposal, abide by its international obligations, and respect Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy, democratic institutions, and civil liberties, which are key to preserving its special status under US law,” he said, adding that the US stands “with the people of Hong Kong.”

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CNN’s Sarah Faidell, Chermaine Lee and Alexander Lin contributed reporting.

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Portuguese traveling the world on a minimoto will meet Ramos Horta on Timor – Observer

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Portuguese traveling the world on a minimoto will meet Ramos Horta on Timor – Observer

The young Portuguese, who has been traveling the world on a mini-motorcycle since 2020, will arrive in Timor-Leste on Monday and meet with the country’s president, the motorcyclist said on Wednesday.

With a residence in Oliveira de Azemeis, in the Aveiro region, and starting his journey in Avis, in Portalegre, André Souza left Portugal on July 12, 2020 to try for a world record, and since then he has driven over 55,000 kilometers through 40 countries, always on a Honda Monkey 125 with nine horses and a height of 70 centimeters.

The 26-year-old is currently based in Darwin, Australia, and it was there that he met two United Nations lawyers who, after working for several years in Timor and personal with Jose Ramos Hortarecognized in the Portuguese trip the type of gamble that would have interested the current president of Timor, the 1996 Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

This friendly couple took care of everything, connected us, and now it was agreed with Ramos Horta’s adviser that I would meet with the president on August 23, although without a motorcycle, which leaves Australia only by boat on the 24th and will not be. arrive on time to appear in the photo,” says Andre Souza Luce from Darwin.

THE PUB • CONTINUE TO READ BELOW

The absence of a car at an official meeting does not prevent the motorcyclist from admitting with satisfaction: “Once I realized that I could drive Timor, it became a dream. I wanted to get to know the country that was a former Portuguese colony, and especially I wanted to get to know Ramos Horta for everything he did for the independence of this land.”

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Initiallypassage through Timor was not planned in the Ride That Monkey project, but became part of the scenario when the direction of the trip had to be changed to get around the fact that in mid-2020 most international borders were still closed or severe mobility restrictions were imposed due to Covid-19.

The idea was to go directly from Europe to Asia, but I had to change the direction of travel and start from America. That is why now, being in Australia and so close to Timor, I decided to go there and through Indonesia before heading to Malaysia and Thailand, ”explains the Portuguese.

Myanmar, India, Pakistan, Iran, Turkey and “some countries in North Africa” ​​are the next destinations, so travel effectively cross “all the continents of the globe” before returning to Portugal scheduled for May or June 2023.

Meanwhile in Darwin, Andre Sousa continues to recover from injuries sustained in his back after he was hit by a truck in California, USA, which left him there for two months. The problem was alleviated with physical therapy and required regular medication, but the pain worsened in Australia after several days of consecutive desert crossings between Cairns and Darwin, covering a total of 2,500 kilometers.

A young Portuguese man traveling the world on a mini-motorcycle is injured in the US.

I had to lie in bed for a week, completely motionless, and now I am accompanied by a chiropractor who has already offered me three consultations for $ 110 each as support for the project,” emphasizes Andre Souza.

The motorcyclist also notes that the trip turned out to be “much more expensive than expected”, due to the difficulties associated with the pandemic and unforeseen health problems. The accident in the United States, for example, involved two months of commercial residence in the Beverly Hills area, where “the simplest hamburger cost at least 10 euros” and, just to transport a motorcycle and driver from Santiago de Chile to Sydney, “the cost was 6000”, in addition to the cost of “a number of documents” that the Australian authorities require when crossing from Darwin to Timor.

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Facing these and other budget changes was only possible thanks to the sponsors of the project and the “donations and support of many different people from all over the world” – as in the case of a Portuguese family that this week welcomes André Sousa to Darwin and 40 subscribers from different countries who donated 50 or 100 euros in exchange for having their name engraved on the minimoto’s fuel tank.

In the next stages of the journey through Asia and Africa, “there will be even more bureaucracy”, but in order to reduce the cost of accommodation and food, the young man will strive to circulate through areas where Portuguese emigrants live what they can get. André Sousa admits that he was welcomed mostly by foreigners, but he does not hide his preference: “I always like to stay with the Portuguese. They do everything they can to help me and make my life easier, and when we’re together, it’s like coming home for a while.”

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″We are not at the time when the Portuguese come here and discover football″

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″We are not at the time when the Portuguese come here and discover football″

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Abel Ferreira has already earned some criticism from Cookie, and now the tone has especially risen after a conference with Atlético Goianiense coach Jorginho.

In Brazil, they continue to discuss Abel’s trip to the locker room in the quarter-final match against Libertadores. Jorginho, the coach of Atlético Goianiense, who has already criticized the Portuguese coach, explained what would happen if the Brazilian team’s technical leader showed the same behavior.

“If a Brazilian coach went into the dressing room to listen to music during a penalty kick, he would be called a coward. But when he wins, nothing happens, everything is right,” he said in press statements.

Jorginho raised his tone and delivered a more general criticism of the Portuguese coach, recalling that football had already been invented in Brazil and that the reigning two-time South American champion had a tougher job ahead of him.

“Abel is a very good coach, period. The question of his abilities is not discussed. It is discussed, especially in this situation, that he did not discover football. football! What happened to Jorge Jesus was extraordinary, what happens to Abel too, but that’s because they have a team like Flamengo and Palmeiras. I want to see him do what he does here at Atlético Goianiense. Come here to become the champion of Brazil,” he explained.

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Francisco J. Marques: “It seems that the evil of Portuguese football is the behavior of the FC Porto bank…” – FC Porto

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Francisco J. Marques: "It seems that the evil of Portuguese football is the behavior of the FC Porto bank..." - FC Porto



Dragons Communications Director Thinks Judges Are Overzealous

Francisco J. Márquez once again criticized the strict actions of the refereeing teams against the FC Porto bank, especially Sergio Conceição, citing as an example what happened in Wiesel compared to what happened in Casa Pia Benfica. The Communications Director of FC Porto considered it an exaggeration how the referees penalize the banks. “The strange thing is what is happening, it seems that the evil of Portuguese football is the behavior of the banks, especially FC Porto. It’s a bit strange that after two days of announcing the new recommendation, this so-called zero tolerance is limited to the Porto FC bench, when in the Casa Pia Benfica game we saw the reaction of the Benfica bench. I think it’s nothing to worry about, it’s normal in any championship, but with zero tolerance for these people should be warned. In the case of a yellow card, Sergio Conceição in Wiesel, the rules were strictly observed because he left the technical area, one can warn with a yellow card, but how many times the coaches leave the technical area “Jorge Jesus played on touch line as if he were a full back I admit that Sergio Conceição left a little technical area but this whole situation does not make sense, let’s hope that common sense will prevail and not force unnatural behavior There are players, coaches and managers who live the game intensively, there are different views on the game, I think that what is happening is a clear exaggeration and this needs to be edit,” Francisco J. Marquez said in an interview with Porto. Channel. .

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